If Curious George Was a CEO

Simon Sinek 

“A boss has the title, a leader has the people.”

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If Curious George Was a CEO

Remember Curious George? The adventurous monkey with an insatiable curiosity and penchant for mischief? He’s one of my favourite characters and I’ve often contemplated what it would be like if he was to trade in his little backpack for a polished bowtie, taking on the role of a CEO. Weird? Maybe. But bear with me. 

There are a lot of admirable qualities to observe in this cheeky monkey. Ever curious and focused on making people feel good, Curious George embodies the traits we work to foster in leadership: empowering teams, ensuring people feel valued, and always open to learning. 

1. A Day Filled with Questions and Hellos!

CEO George would start every day with a warm hello to everyone, making his way through the office with infectious cheer. In his new role, the questions would be relentless. His innate curiosity would transform regular team meetings into explorative sessions, delving deep into the ‘whys’ and ‘hows’ of business processes. He would focus on building strong relationships, ensuring that trust and transparency were always at the heart of everything.

2. Reimagining Possibilities and Processes

With our boy George at the helm, things would never get stagnant. He’d be perpetually reimagining possibilities and reinventing processes, turning the status quo on its head. The office would be transformed into a hub of innovation, with every day bringing a fresh perspective and new opportunities. Curious George would never say “But, we’ve always done it this way…”  and, as a result, he would foster a culture that inspires and encourages.

3. The Childlike Wonder and Curiosity

When I imagine Curious George as a CEO, I’m called to picture Tom Hanks in ‘The Kid,’ where he navigates the world with the mentality of a 7-year-old, illustrates the idea that a child’s mentality and innate curiosity can be pivotal to achieving success in leadership roles. Just imagine, a CEO with the fresh, untainted perspective of a child, refusing to merely live the title, and transforming the mundane into exciting ventures!

4. Cross-training and Cross-support

Curious George the CEO would surely introduce the concept of cross-training and cross-support. This would mean a collaborative environment where employees could learn and support each other across different domains, fostering a stronger, more versatile team. 

5. Curiosity: The Gateway to Deeper Understanding

George’s leadership would emphasize a question-driven process, with the belief that curiosity is the key to delving below the surface and constructing a more resilient and innovative business structure. Curiosity, after all, doesn’t just kill the cat; it builds empires!

6. Unleashing the Power of Questions

If you have kids, or you’ve spent any time around kids, you know about the question phase. Kids love asking questions and it’s lamentable that many are, at some point, silenced from doing so. 

CEO George would vehemently squash the archaic ‘seen and not heard’ mentality – both in children and in corporate settings. He’d advocate for a world where everyone is perpetually encouraged to ask questions, fostering a generation of leaders unafraid to question and learn.

So, what if every workplace had a Curious George? A CEO who doesn’t accept the status quo and whose childlike wonder and relentless curiosity fuel a workplace revolution! Such a leader would make people feel good, valued, and inspired to explore the uncharted territories of their imagination and creativity.

Embodying Curious George in your leadership approach can be a profound reminder that curiosity, cross-support, and a relentless pursuit of knowledge can reshape our businesses and create a future where leaders are understanding, approachable, and (of course) ever-curious!

Social Posts:

  1. Remember Curious George? While you might think of him as a mischievous monkey, I often lie to imagine what he’d be like if he was a CEO or leader. What do you think? Would he be a hot mess or a power house? 
  2. Imagine a CEO who doesn’t accept the status quo, asks questions, and maintains a child-like curiosity when it comes to finding new ways to solve old problems. What would your organization look like? 

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